Imalent DN35 2200 Lumen Rechargeable Flashlight

Today’s review is for the Imalent DN35.

This is a small and compact light which is reminiscent of their earlier DN11, which I liked… but some users complained of cold weather affecting the electronic switch. They’ve conquered that this time. Read on to find out how!

Well Accessorized

Within the familiar blue Imalent packaging, you’ll find the DN35, a couple of spare o-rings, a belt holster, a micro USB charging cable, and an Imalent 4500mAh 26650 rechargeable battery.

Features of the DN35

For its size — 4.4″ tall, and 1.5″ at the head.

With the battery, it weighs 210 grams.

The LED is a CREE XHP35, “high intensity” which focuses the beam into a long-throwing cone of light. Beam distance is rated at 596 meters! That’s 651 yards!!

Cree XHP35 LED

Battery insertion

Tailcap identifier

Micro USB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s impact resistant to 1.5 meters, and submersible to 2 meters.

A highly efficient constant current circuit maintains brightness for as long as possible.

The lens is coated, toughened ultra-clear mineral glass.

Its body is aerospace-grade aluminum alloy, treated with a Type-III hard anodized finish.

An internal charging circuit accurately charges any 26650 battery.

There’s also a unique “OLED” display which keeps the user informed of battery voltage and output.

Imalent DN35 "OLED" display

“OLED” display (med)

“OLED” display (turbo)

Imalent DN35 OLED display showing battery voltage

“OLED” display (volts)

 

 

 

 

 

Mode memory recalls the last mode used.

Battery, Output and Runtime

*Included in the package is a 3.7v 26650 battery.

The DN35 has four regular modes; low, medium, high and turbo. Corresponding outputs are as follows;

  • Low; 20 lumens — 50 hours
  • Medium; 450 lumens — 4 hrs 30 min
  • High; 1500 lumens — 2 hrs 50 min
  • Turbo; 2200 lumens — 2 hrs 10 min

*Obviously the included battery is the intended power source. You can use other brands of 26650’s if you choose to… but, the light is fussy, and probably WON’T work if the battery has a button-top! The Imalent battery is a flat-top.

Here’s How to Operate the Imalent DN35 

Imalent DN35 power switches

The two switches & display

It has two switches on the head… on either side of each other. The LEFT switch activates TURBO and the three flashing modes; strobe, SOS, and beacon. The button on the right, is the power switch/mode changer.

So, click the power button to turn it on. Each press will advance the mode. A HOLDING press is required to turn it off. Each time you press the button, the “OLED” display will show you which mode you’re in… by indicating the lumens associated with that mode! In addition, it also displays the battery voltage… and toggles the two for about 30 seconds, before the display turns off. You can restore the display by pressing the LEFT switch at any time. Pressing the POWER button again also reactivates the display, but changes the mode as well.

TURBO can be activated in a couple of different ways.

  • When the light is off, you can use turbo for a split second by pressing and releasing the LEFT switch. If you want it on constantly, press and HOLD the LEFT switch for about 2 seconds. (“2200” will appear in the display)
  • If the light is already ON, in a different mode, press and HOLD the left switch. If you press and release the switch, you’ll get a “burst” of turbo.
  • You CANNOT get to turbo by cycling through the regular modes with the mode switch.

STROBE and the flashing modes can be activated in similar ways to turbo. While the light is off, you can get “instant” strobe by DOUBLE-CLICKING the left switch. Each consecutive double-click, activates the next emergency mode. Press and HOLD the power switch to turn it off. A quick press of the same button will return to the LAST regular mode used. If the light is already on, then DOUBLE-CLICK the left switch and follow the previous procedure.

Low Battery Warning 

Imalent DN35 flashlight and included battery

DN35 and battery

If you fail to notice the voltage getting low within the display…then shame on you!! Be that as it may, if you’re completely shameless, it will alert you to this tragedy when the voltage drops below 3.1, by “blinking” (within the display) eight times every thirty seconds! If you fail to heed this warning, you’ll soon have no light!

Battery voltage can be checked anytime… even when the light is off. Just press the LEFT switch, and it’ll appear in the display.

This NOW brings us to….

…the Internal Charging Circuit 

Full charge

Partial charge

Pull back the micro USB cover and insert the included charging cable. Once it’s connected, the OLED display will show an animated charging battery icon. When the charge is complete, the animation will show the battery as being full, and quickly disappear. Your first clue to the charge being finished, will be that the display is blank. I ran a tester on the charging current, and was pleased to see it was up near 900mA!

Imalent DN35 Beam Gallery

Low @60 ft

Medium

High

Low — 20 ft

High

Medium mode

Imalent DN35 on turbo mode

Turbo

Imalent DN35 on turbo

Turbo again

on tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Thoughts on the Imalent DN35

It’s a good flashlight. It’s small, bright, and very functional. I like the OLED display! It’s easy to read and provides good information.

The buttons are placed relatively close together, which is good. BUT… unless you develop a personally unique method of finding them in total darkness, it might be a bit of a challenge… at first anyway. The upper body of the light has vents for dissipating heat,  which can be misinterpreted while running your fingers around it trying to locate the switches. At least they have rubber covers, so if you can find two close together, you’re good.

Internal charging seems to work well, but I wish it had a better way of signalling a completed charge, other than the display simply going dark.

The Imalent DN35 was supplied by GearBest for review, so my recommendation would be if you’d like to have one…

….then please click here!

 

 

 

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